Oceans of Reflection

Phase One

Pacific Voices at Kōkua Kalihi Valley Partnership | ‘Ulu DRS Webinar #7 | Community Mural Painting at Honolulu Community College | Lab Member Experiences | O Maikonesia Kēia

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Pacific Voices at Kōkua Kalihi Valley Partnership

“…Thatʻs how human beings are, we migrate, we get colonized, and we get changed, and we change.” – Community Navigator Tamana Paul Ottoko.

The Māpuna lab is partnering with Pacific Voices, a youth program at Kōkua Kalihi Valley, to create a mural inspired by Kuʻu ʻĀina Aloha: Beloved Land, Beloved Country

Pacific Voices was created by Innocenta Sound-Kikku as a space where mothers who feared their children would grow up not knowing where they came from could teach their children about the sacred pillars of identity. The Micronesian migrant community is an extension of the navigating societies they descend from. Just as their ancestors before them, they traversed vast stretches of ocean, albeit by plane, in search of new opportunities to build better homes than they have known for their children.  

To heal from this trauma is a daunting task. Art and culture can be tools to process the pain carried by the Micronesian community for generations following decades of uninterrupted colonization by the Spanish, the Germans, the Japanese, and most recently the United States. There is power in reclaiming relationships both to the Pacific homeland and the navigational identity inherent within.

‘Ulu DRS Webinar #7: Community Mural

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Community Mural Painting at Honolulu Community College

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Lab Member

Experiences

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Stories

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Connection

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Ancestry

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Connection

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O Maikonesia Kēia

This is Micronesia

A poem by Carol Ann Carl

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Kākuhihewa

(c. 1540-1634)

Kākuhihewa is the 15th aliʻi ‘aimoku (ruling chief) of O‘ahu famously named in the mele “Kaulana Nā Pua.” Kākuhihewa was a kind and friendly chief who was born in Kūkaniloko and raised in the ‘Ewa moku. His primary endeavor was farming, and it is said that his abundant harvests on O‘ahu could be smelled from Kaua‘i.

Today, there is a state office building named after him in Kapolei.